Making Sense of the Super Reforms

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If you are waiting for the superannuation reforms announced in the Budget to pass Parliament before working out what they mean to you, you might miss out on any opportunities available. When enacted, the reforms will represent the single biggest change to superannuation since its inception. While there has been a softening of the original Budget announcements, there are still some very big changes coming your way.

Accumulators: Under 65s

The reforms likely to impact on you are:

Reduction in non-concessional contribution caps

If you are close to retirement age and looking to build your super balance, this change is incredibly important. From 1 July 2017, the annual non-concessional contributions cap will be reduced to $100,000 (from the current $180,000). This means that if you are approaching retirement age, you have until 30 June 2017 to use the current caps and contribute up to $540,000 this financial year. You can do this using the ‘bring forward’ rule.  This rule allows you to bring forward up to three years worth of non-concessional contributions in one year (and then make no or limited contributions for the next two years until you reach your three year cap).  The advantage of using the bring forward rule now is that your three years worth of contributions utilise the current caps.  If you contribute more than $180,000 this financial year but not the full $540,000, you still trigger the bring forward rule but any further contributions from 1 July 2017 are subject to the new $100,000 cap. That is, instead of your cap being $540,000 across three years, it might be $460,000 or $380,000.  And, if you wait until after 1 July 2017 to trigger the bring forward rule, you will only be able to contribute up to $300,000. If you want to make in-specie contributions – that is, contributions to super that are not cash such as listed shares, etc., then you should look at whether the cap reduction affects your ability to do this.

People with Large Super Balances & High Income Earners

The Government thinks that you are not using superannuation for its intended purpose – to fund retirement. As a result, the reforms introduce a whole series of measures that pare back the tax advantages for people with large super balances:

Non-concessional contributions capped at $1.6 million

Once your super balance has reached $1.6m, from 1 July 2017 you will no longer be able to make non-concessional contributions to super. So, you have until then to maximise your contributions (see Reduction in non-concessional contribution caps).  Going forward, your super balance will be assessed at 30 June each year.

Concessional contributions cap reduced

From 1 July 2017, the annual concessional contribution cap will be reduced to $25,000 for everyone (currently $30,000 for those aged under 50 and $35,000 for those aged 50 and over).

30% tax on super extended to more taxpayers

High income earners with incomes of $300,000 or more pay 30% tax on contributions they make. From 1 July 2017, this threshold will reduce to $250,000.

 

“This article has been provided by The Knowledge Shop ”

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